Mixing up the workout routine

Made up a killer workout today, totally adhoc. Had to jot it down just now so I won’t forget it. (no, this is not a CrossFit WOD. It’s JoeFit. I’m no disciple)

Warmup
————
30s jog in place
30s jumping jacks
10 burpee pushups
1 minute walking lunges
3 min stretch

Workout (no rest between steps)
—————————————-
1. jog 1/3 mile
2. 20 burpee pushups, turn around
3. jog back home 1/3 mile
4. 25 tuck-jump burpees
5. walking lunges with oak log (~40lbs) on one shoulder – across backyard
6. hurl oak log as far as possible with one arm
7. 10 leapfrog jumps over pile of logs (~3 feet wide) (leap once, surfer spin, then leap over again)
REPEAT 3 times

Cooldown
—————
walk 1/4 mile, 10 burpee pushups
REPEAT 4 times

about 45 minutes start to finish.

those walking lunges with the oak log on one shoulder use a surprising amount of energy. By keeping the weight on just one shoulder, it really involves core muscles. Obviously alternate sides accordingly.

Must eat!

Coconut Berry Guava Protein Super Shake

You will feel like a million bucks after a glass of this. No poison.

Features

  • No soy (yuck)
  • No gluten
  • No dairy

Ingredients for 4 servings

  • 2 cups Coconut milk (plain)
  • 2 cups frozen berry mix (straw, blue, rasp), in the frozen aisle in most supermarkets
  • 1 cup Guava Nectar (or cold water if you don’t have it or want to save some cals)
  • 1 teaspoon Cinnamon
  • Ice
  • 3 scoops protein powder, unflavored, vanilla or strawberry (optional)

Nutrition Facts per Serving (w/ protein powder)

  • Calories: 196
  • Carbs: 24
  • Fat: 4
  • Protein: 19
  • Sodium: 48

Instructions
Good quality blender or smoothie maker. Has to handle ice. You may be thinking, why the ice if the berries are frozen? Trust me, any smoothie or shake of any kind needs some ice if you want it to be nice and frosty, otherwise you end up with some drippy cold stuff, not a frosty drink. You can skip the protein powder if that’s not your kinda thing. I use whey which is technically not dairy, but I’m not hung up about it.

Start with the ice and liquids, then add the berries, then the protein powder and finally cinnamon. If you are using the powder, you may need to add a bit more water to the mix.

This is a perfect post-workout recovery drink. Enjoy.

Cloud Terms: Server vs. Service?

If you were describing your cloud service, whether it be a SaaS, PaaS, would the term “server” ever come up at all?

Let’s say your team came up with a new innovation that they call the “Foo Server”. A brilliant piece of engineering, the Foo Server can do incredible things. Your product management team describes the feature set of a “Foo Server”, and then ship it to marketing to name it.

As a SaaS company, would you say “Introducing the Foo Server”? What the heck is a server to a SaaS customer? A VM? a blade? Why would they care? Wouldn’t you instead describe the features and maybe brand the name as “Foo Service” – your cloud for all things foo?

Understanding M2M Devices

I spend a lot of time talking to folks in the M2M ecosystem: network carriers, device manufacturers, systems integrators, and customers. I’ve come to realize that many of the terms used in M2M are fuzzy, and this fuzziness can lead to some confusing conversations. Worse than confusion, the inconsistency makes it very difficult for the uninitiated to make sense of the M2M “industry”, and leads to the perception of wild-west fragmentation.

I recently spent quite a lot of time Googling around for a good summary of M2M device technologies that I hoped to share on this blog. Unfortunately I couldn’t find one. I could not even find good definitions of the device “classes” (as I refer to them) on their own. What is a cellular module? What is a modem? What is this thing that has embedded Linux: a modem?

So, to fill this void, I give you this article on M2M Devices Types. Comments welcome!

Apple iCloud and the Internet of iThings

Apple is a great company with great products, and the stuff they do right is well known and documented by hordes of fanboys and fangirls. I am no disciple, but I do use and love Apple products. But as someone who is part of the Internet of Things intelligentsia, I must say they have made some missteps lately, and both of them are in areas squarely in our wheelhouse.

First let’s talk about upgrading to iOS 5. Apple’s servers strained under the load of the hordes downloading the updates on day one, and many were met with decidedly non-Applesque error messages related to the servers’ inability to keep up. This made the updates fail in horrible ways, with little guidance to help recover. I evaded the server problems on day 3, but only got through the long painful iCloud-ification of my iPhone’s backup thanks to a preflight review of the blogosphere. For 2 hours, while my iPhone was still tethered to my desktop and appeared updated, my apps were gone and continued to trickle down either over the USB cable or through iCloud. I could not tell which.

Then there’s iCloud. It’s an obvious evolution of the iDevice platform, and is deservedly greeted with frothing excitement by the Apple community. But it’s not ready for prime time. As I researched how this was all supposed to work, all I found was Apple marketecture promises of photo streams syncing automatically, all my device data backed up and replicated for me automagically. Great, I thought. Now where do I configure all of these rules about where photos get sent, which updates, apps, and content to send to which of my devices. I have 7 iOS devices under my management. I don’t want them all getting the same content. I need a management portal to keep all of this straight. The reality is, www.icloud.com ain’t it, kids. At present, one needs to manually configure each device, and even then I am still really foggy about what happens, and when.

This is M2M. Devices doing things automatically, communicating in the cloud and influencing people and other devices in real time. Except with iCloud, there’s very little in the way of privacy or “solution” management for the end user.

So M2M newb mistake #1: when millions of devices all need to check in to your server cloud, you better have surge-scaled that cloud appropriately and thought of all the ways things will go wrong and provide a rollback process when they do. This lesson is well understood by M2M practitioners and our customers – we don’t have the luxury of having a technophile in front of devices. Software updates to M2M devices need to happen silently, automatically, and reliably. We have spent thousands of engineering days working on exactly this problem.

M2M newb mistake #2: users need to be in control and know they are orchestrating this wonderfully magic information synchronization. Simply saying “automatic and effortless” is not enough, even if that were the case. I know our customers would be more comfortable in hearing “secure, manageable, and automated”. A little effort is not always a bad thing, as long as it makes sense.

Perhaps iCloud’s new product manager may want to give us a call. :)

jQuery Mobile Rocks!

I was time I wrote an iPad app. And an Android app. And by the way it should run well on an iPhone too. And a Playbook.

So it turns out I just wanted an app that had a great mobile experience and looked at home on those mobile platforms.

jQuery Mobile to the rescue. jQuery is a rockstar Javascript library that makes cross browser Javascript and AJAX a snap. Many of our developer.axeda.com UI examples utilize jQuery. jQuery mobile is a plugin that makes the styling, cross-platform obile features a breeze to support. Apps look perfect on Safari Mobile (iOS), Android, and while I haven’t tested it yet, I’m sure they look great on the Playbook.

I’ve been working on an Axeda Mobile app. Soon I’ll be sharing code for the full project, but in the meantime you can test drive this snippet via JS Fiddle – another amazing discovery!

http://jsfiddle.net/axeda/f3WyY/

 

Diablo Soup Recipe

This recipe started as tortilla soup. Then I kept throwing more stuff in. The result is fiery, thick, and awesome.

Ingredients
chicken:
4 large chicken breasts with skin and bone
4-6 chicken thighs, with skin and bone
3 large onions, quartered
1/2 head celery, coarsely chopped
2 large carrots, coarsely chopped
2 bay leaves
1/4 cup whole peppercorns

peppers:
1 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
4 jalapeno chiles, seeded and chopped or thinly sliced
2 red chile or thai chile pepper, seeded and chopped or thinly sliced
2 habanero peppers
3 large red bell pepper
2 tbsp white vinegar

soup:
4 tbsp corn oil
2 quarts chicken broth or stock
1 cup white rice
2 large red onion, chopped
1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes
3 limes
2 ounces dried porcini mushrooms, soaked in water until soft, drained, and chopped
4 ears corn
4 tbls ground cumin
4 tbls cinnamon
1 tbls ground white pepper
4 tbls paprika
1/4 cup molasses
salt to taste (careful)

serving:
tortilla chips
1 cup shredded white Cheddar

Directions
Crockpot:
rub chicken with cumin and papkrika
add peppercorns, bay leaves, chicken breasts and thighs
cook on high for 3-4 hours or low for 8-10 hours

Post-Crockpot:
let chick cool on sheetpan, enough to handle
remove skin and discard
pull meat from bones and shred – reserve to the side

Oven:
roast red peppers and corn at 375 degrees until they start to char a little
then take out to cool on counter

Vegetable Prep:
dice peppers and onions
dice soaked and rinsed porcini mushrooms
cut corn from cobs

Soup:
heat corn oil in large pot
saute diced chile peppers (not the habanero), corn, red onion until onion is tender
add mushrooms, saute until tender
slowly add 2 quarts chicken broth and bring to boil
add 1 cup white rice
reduce heat to low-medium and simmer for 20 minutes

Blender:
meanwhile….
remove tops and bottoms from roasted red peppers and remove seeds
take chipotles out of can and discard adobo sauce (can leave some clinging to peppers though)
add about 1/4 cup broth to a blender
puree broth, roasted red peppers, chipotles, and 2 tbsp white vinegar
add puree to soup pot, but keep about 1/c in the blender

remove tops from habaneros and scrape out seeds, pop them in the blender and puree with the remaining stuff
place this Devil Sauce in a small separate serving dish

Back to soup:
add cumin, paprika, white pepper, cinnamon, and molasses
add salt to taste (slowly, and let some dissolve before you taste)
add shredded chicken
let simmer until you think it is thick enough to call it … Diablo Stew!

Serve:
Crumble tortilla chips over bowl, add some cheese, let guests add Devil Sauce to taste

Add the chicken and cilantro and cook for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.